Animal Acupressure Blog

The Interrelationships of Traditional Chinese Medicine

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), all things are interrelated. Yin and Yang cannot exist without the other; Chi and Blood are both necessary for any animal to survive; and every organ system needs all the other organ systems in order for the body to be healthy and vital. Often clients don’t see the interrelationships and instead recognize symptoms as distinct and isolated. So it was with Fiona.  [READ POST]

How Acupressure and Massage can Benefit Equine Cervical Issues

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow There are so many ways a horse may injure its cervical vertebrae or damage the muscles and tendons of the neck, from participation in demanding sports, being ridden with ill-fitting tack, being ridden improperly, by pulling back when tied, trailering, and more. Such injuries often present as: Restricted or painful neck movement Unusual or inappropriate head carriage Difficulty raising or loweri [READ POST]

Animal Acupressure & Olfaction: What's in a Smell

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow, Tallgrass Animal Acupressure Institute In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) we use an assessment technique called “The Four Examinations.” The Four Examinations are: Observation, Listening / Smelling, Inquiry or History, and Physical Palpation. This method of data collection about the animal leads to identifying a pattern of disharmony. The TCM practitioner must have highly refined, keen senses to perform eac [READ POST]

Acupressure & Acupuncture: What’s the Difference?

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow, authors of Equine Acupressure: A Working Manual A horsefly is mid-air, within inches of landing on the horse’s flank. The surface of his flank twitches just before the fly has a chance to land, warding it off in advance of being stung. This is how sensitive a horse is! He can feel everything within inches of his body. Whether this is a voluntary or involuntary response to the fly’s approach, it doesn’t matter, s [READ POST]

Adapting to Adoption

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis, Tallgrass Founders (http://www.animalacupressure.com) Miles looked so scared and disoriented at the shelter. Miles, an 11-year old black and tan dachshund, looked so pathetic in his cage Sandy had to take him home. His coat was a powdery gray instead of shiny black. His belly was bloated. And, his little tail looked as if it had been broken a number of times, but he was anxiously wagging his entire hind end hung [READ POST]

Canine Acupressure & Pancreatitis: Meet Ben

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis, Tallgrass Founders This is the true story of Ben. Ben is a 13-year old Golden Retriever with a lovely large frame and a fading red coat. His guardians were told by their veterinarian that his pancreas had failed and it was best to put him down. Ben’s guardians decided to take him home. Let’s back up on Ben’s story. His guardians were feeding him a relatively high-quality, dry, manufactured food. After  [READ POST]

Acupressure Points to Joint Health

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By: Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow Ever have a horse whose joints go snap, crackle, and pop as he’s walking? Equine sports can be rough on joints. And, the older a horse gets the odds are arthritis will occur causing noisy and painful changes in his joints. Osteoarthritis is most common in a horse’s weight-bearing joints such as the hock, fetlock, pastern, and coffin joints. It is less common for a horse to develop arthritis in the stif [READ POST]

San Zhen Protocols: 3-AcuPoint Case Study #1

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By: Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow Lower Jiao Damp Heat and Chi Stagnation Molly is a spaniel exhibiting a chronic urinary tract infection. Her guardians noticed her urine was darker than normal and had a stronger, somewhat foul smell. They also noticed that Molly urinated mroe frequently but only a little at a time. Molly strained to urinate and was uncomfortable and nippy when her belly was rubbed, something she had always loved. A [READ POST]

Use Moxibustion to Strengthen the Immune System and Relieve Allergies

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By: Nancy Zidonis and Amy Snow From a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) perspective allergies occur when our immune system is not functioning at its optimal level. If our Wei (protective) chi is strong we will not be affected by allergies, the flu or other similar issues. In essence, our Wei chi, battles against the external pathogenic factors of Wind, Cold, Summer Heat, Damp, Dryness and Heat to keep us healthy and strong. Moxibus [READ POST]

Anhidrosis (drycoat syndrome or non-sweating disease)

2016-11-25T00:00:00
By: Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis Anhidrosis is also known as 'drycoat syndrome' or 'non-sweating disease'. In the early stages or less severe cases, there will be less sweat in areas under the saddle than is normal after a workout. In its initial stages anhidrosis is also known as 'puff disease' because horses pant heavily, even after work ceases. Horses will have very little, patchy or no sweat, elevated pulse, and a higher than normal b [READ POST]